Tag Archives: Pynchon

Pictures in the Pages (Part 2)

Last time I blogged about standalone illustrations in children’s and adult literature. This time I’ll explore illustrations that interact directly with the text. As I read Jonathan Franzen’s The Corrections earlier this year, I’ll take a quick look at a few of his visual tricks first. For those who haven’t read it, The Corrections focuses on […]

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What do you call it?

The following is the final post of a three-part series on Thomas Pynchon’s novel Inherent Vice. Spoiler warning for those who might want to take the dive: ditto if you’ve heard about the up-coming movie from Paul Thomas Anderson starring Joaquin Phoenix. “Whadda ya call it?” Where I come from that colloquialism means, “Help me […]

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Pynchon’s eyeball: the elusive and enticing search for meaning

Two weeks ago I posted about the color scheme of pink and green in Thomas Pynchon’s Inherent Vice (2009). So I completed that novel last week and was struck with no epiphanies. I guess that lack of an “ah-ha!” moment when I finished reading the final page should have come as no surprise. Good reading of […]

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The Color Scheme: Pink and Green in Pynchon’s Inherent Vice

Pity the critics. Imagine being a book reviewer, slave to the deadline, when one afternoon Thomas Pynchon’s Mason & Dixon lands on your desk like a fat, dead fish. You have the weekend to read and review it. Your readers are waiting. I suppose the dread of this situation would apply to most novels by […]

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